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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of Thermal and histological consequences of photorefractive keratectomy found in the catalog.

Thermal and histological consequences of photorefractive keratectomy

C. Maldonado-Codina

Thermal and histological consequences of photorefractive keratectomy

by C. Maldonado-Codina

  • 191 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by UMIST in Manchester .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementC. Maldonado-Codina ; supervised by P. Morgan.
ContributionsMorgan, P., Optometry and Vision Sciences.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16793059M

Thermal consequences of photorefractive keratectomy By Carole Maldonado-Codina, Philip Morgan and Nathan Efron No static citation data No static citation data Cite.   PRK is a type of laser eye surgery to correct your vision. You’ll have mild discomfort in the first 24 to 72 hours after the procedure. You might be sensitive to light for a while, too.

PRK is a type of laser eye surgery to correct your vision. Your eyesight might be blurry for the first few weeks. Until it evens out, you might need glasses to read or drive at night. Histopathology of corneal wound healing after photorefractive keratectomy in rabbit eyes Article (PDF Available) in Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: ) 14(2 Suppl):S

Refractive surgery is the newest subspecialty in ophthalmology, gaining popularity after the introduction of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ . Abstract. Objective: To review the long-term efficacy, stability and reliability of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) treatment in hyperopia patients and to assess the complications that may arise during the follow-up period. Materials and Methods: 76 eyes of 42 patients who underwent PRK treatment for hyperopia were included in this retrospective study.


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Thermal and histological consequences of photorefractive keratectomy by C. Maldonado-Codina Download PDF EPUB FB2

Thermal and histological consequences of photorefractive keratectomy By Carole Maldonado-Codina, Philip B. Morgan, Richard E. Bonshek, Sunil Shah, Anupam Chatterjee and Nathan Efron Topics: OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY, Optical Technology.

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases. These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually by: Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser-assisted sub-epithelial keratectomy (or laser epithelial keratomileusis) (LASEK) are laser eye surgery procedures intended to correct a person's vision, reducing dependency on glasses or contact and PRK permanently change the shape of the anterior central cornea using an excimer laser to ablate (remove by vaporization) a small amount of ICDCM: Human excimer laser keratectomy.

Clinical and histopathologic correlations. Ophthalmology. Jun; (6)– Balestrazzi E, De Molfetta V, Spadea L, Vinciguerra P, Palmieri G, Santeusanio G, Spagnoli L. Histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in human corneas after photorefractive by:   What Will My Vision Be Like After Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK).

About 9 out of 10 people (90 percent) who have PRK end up with 20/40 vision or better without glasses or contact lenses. It is important to know that PRK cannot correct presbyopia. This is. St Louis Mo: Mosby year book Inc; pp.

11– Sano Y, Itoh Y, Tsuneoka H, Ohki K, Sakabe I, Kitahara K, Okamoto S. Changes in descemet membrane and endothelium after corneal epithelial abrasion alone and with photorefractive keratectomy in.

Phototherapeutic keratectomy for decentration and central islands after photorefractive keratectomy. Ophthalmology. ;(3) Taneri S, Koch JM, Melki SA, et al. Mitomycin-C assisted photorefractive keratectomy in the treatment of buttonholed laser in situ keratomileusis flaps associated with epithelial ingrowth.

Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) In a histological study using rabbit eyes,11 tissue damage from laser ablation was minimized by cooling the and myopic regression. The thermal effect has been ignored by many excimer laser surgeons, but perhaps we should reconsider thermal damage during PRK, especially when using a large.

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), developed by Trokel and colleagues inuses an excimer laser that emits ultraviolet light of nanometers (nm), a combination of Argon and Fluor (ArF) to remodel the corneal.

1–6 It was not until when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) aproved PRK as a refractive surgery technique. 7 In PRK. To evaluate the long term clinical results of mechanical no-alcohol-assisted laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) versus standard photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for low-moderate myopia.

METHODS Twenty-five eyes treated with LASEK and twenty-five eyes treated with PRK were evaluated with a mean follow-up duration of 60mo. Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is the alteration of corneal curvature by photoablation with an excimer laser to eliminate or significantly reduce refractive errors.

In this paper, we present a. This article details the wound healing responses to corneal refractive surgery procedures that are most commonly performed, including photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK), laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE), but also includes incisional procedures such as radial keratotomy (RK), as well as contact laser.

Several studies have reported that cooling cornea has effects on alleviating pain post Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK). However, our random prospective self-control study using 52 eyes of cons of the procedure include: * mild discomfort, including minor eye irritation and watering, for one to three days after the procedure * a longer recovery time than after other procedures (one to.

Materials and methods: In this prospective study, eyes of mice underwent bilateral photorefractive keratectomy. We considered 4 groups: A, B, C, and D.

Group A received standard topical postoperative therapy with tobramycin, diclofenac, and dexamethasone eyedrops plus CCP at 3 drops per day for a week or until corneal re-epithelialization was achieved.

What happens during a photorefractive keratectomy. ANSWER The doctor will numb your eye with a topical anesthetic. The surgery usually takes about 10 minutes -- at most -- and that’s for both eyes. Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), common surgical method that reshapes the cornea (the transparent membrane covering the front of the eye) to improve vision in patients affected by farsightedness (hyperopia) or nearsightedness (myopia).

In this procedure a. M. Vetrugno, A. Maino, E. Valenzano, L. CardiaCorneal temperature changes during photorefractive keratectomy using the Laserscan flying spot laser J Refract Surg, 17 (), pp.

Google Scholar. also known as prk, photorefractive keratectomy is a type of laser eye surgery can help if you are nearsighted, farsighted, or have astigmatism. it works best if your eye problem is mild or moderate. Our purpose was to perform high-speed photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) with femtosecond UV pulses in rabbits and to evaluate its predictability, reproducibility and healing response.

The laser source delivered femtosecond nm pulses with a repetition rate of 50 kHz and an average power of mW. Photorefractive keratectomy disrupts corneal structure affecting epithelium, Bowman's membrane, and anterior stroma.

Corneal nerves are severed, which alters corneal integrity and function temporarily. The subsequent corneal wound healing is a complex process that is.

In recent years, interest in photorefractive keratectomy has mainly focused on the use of the excimer laser at the nm wavelengthi Infrared.

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a relatively new procedure for the surgical correction of myopia. Through the work of numerous investigators over .